How to fit a long throw gate lock

Long throw gate locks are becoming more popular, they are in truth fairly easy to fit your most difficult task is marking he hole for the cylinder of the lock – get this right and it’s a doddle! Here we show you how to fit a long throw gate lock.

Note: This guide refers to the Perrys version of the long throw gate locks, not the Cays version – although similar they do differ slightly so beware. However we have included the measurements required for fitting the Gatemate versions of the long throw locks as well.

Double locking? Single locking?! 50mm or 70mm?!

There are two main types of the Perrys long throw locks, the ‘key lockable from both sides version’ (aka Double locking version) which as its name implies can be opened from either side with a key and the more economical ‘Key lockable with spring latch to the rear’ (aka Perrys single locking long throw locks or lock latch version) which opens by way of a latch on the rear and a key on the front.

Rear view Perrys double locking gate lock

Rear of the double locking (key lockable from both sides) version of the long throw gate lock

Lock/latch version of the Perrys long throw gate lock

Rear of the lock/latch version of the long throw gate lock

Both are divided further into two types, for gates or doors upto 50mm thick and for gates or doors upto 70mm thick, but we will ignore this for the time being as fitting any of the Perrys long throw gate locks is exactly the same (If fitting the Gatemate versions then it does differ from the Perrys locks and also between the different versions of the Gatemate locks!

The various parts of a long throw gate lock

The parts are basically the same between the two versions of the locks and are not much different between a Perrys and Gatemate lock

The various parts of a Perrys long throw lock

A – Main body of lock (Differs between the two versions)
B – Receiver/Keep
C – Escutcheon (this can be replaced with optional handles)
D – Screws (for fixing both main body of lock and receiver to the gate
E – Keys
F – Instructions (A bit vague really, hence the guide – do we look after you or what?!)

Tools required to fit the long throw gate lock

You will need the following tools to fit the Gatemate lock to the gates

Cordless drill/driver,
3mm drill bit,
2mm drill bit,
*28mm Spade bit / Flat bit,
Phillips driver bit,
Small slotted screwdriver,
Square,
Tape measure,
Rule,
Pencil,

Tools required to fit a Perrys lock

*The actual Perrys (and Gatemate come to that) lock instructions refer to a 26mm spade bit/flat bit, however Perrys (and Gatemate) themselves actually sell a 28mm spade bit / flat bit for the locks. either can be used but the 28mm bit gives a bit more room to slide the barrel of the lock through the gate.

The Perrys lock attaches to the gate using four screws, however before we can fit the lock we need to drill out for the barrel of the lock – to do this we first need to position the lock where we want it.

Where to position the long throw gate lock?

A word of warning before you start, there are videos around on the internet showing the locks fitted to gates with morticed and tenon jointed frames in the position where a horizontal rail meets a vertical member (the stile – the outer framework of the gates), if you’ve seen any of these videos then disregard them as they are wrong.

Avoid fitting the lock over a mortice and tenon joint

If you fit the lock over a mortice a tenon joint then you will weaken the joint

If you do fit the lock over the mortice and tenon joint then you are undermining the joint, worse case scenario is the joint will fail as you’ve drilled a 26mm or 28mm diameter hole right the way through the joint – as an example of what I mean go and have a look at your front door (if you’ve a wooden one) and look for the position of either a mortice lock or Yale type cylinder lock, they are always fitted away from the mortice and tenon joint.

Mortice and tenon joint reduced due to lock hole

The tenon is reduced in size due to the hole being drilled through it – this weakens the joint.

Our gates are based on a wedged morticed and tenon joint and fitting the locks over this joint is bad enough, however the main culprits of showing the locks fitted over a mortice and tenon joint actually use ‘dowelled morticed and tenon joints’ (which are bad enough in their own right) but in most cases if you were drilling out over the joint for the lock then you would be drilling out the very thing that (the dowel or pin as it actually should be known) that is meant to be holding the joint together (and with a dowel it’s debatable whether it actually holds the joint together that well anyway but rant over 🙂 )

Fitting the Perrys long throw gate lock

To fit the long throw lock, we work from the rear of the gate as that is where the lock fits and the main thing to remember is to keep the cam holes (on the underside of the locking bar) facing downwards to avoid water getting into the lock.
Which way around to fit the Gatemate lock

Make sure these cam holes in the underside of the locking bar face down towards the ground!

To start with we need to decide on the position of the lock, so mark on the gate the centre line where you want the lock to sit and then square this line horizontally across the gate stile (vertical upright).

The next task is to mark the position of the hole that takes the cylinder of the lock – this is the same whether you are using a 50mm or 70mm Perrys double locking long throw lock or the Perrys single locking version.

We now need to mark a second line 16mm below and parallel to the first centre line.

Finally we then mark a vertical line 58mm in from the edge of the gate (this gives you a 5mm space between the edge of the gate and body of the lock once fitted. if you want to increase this distance then just increase the 58mm measurement by what you require).

You can then skip the next section that is specifically for the Gatemate versions of the long throw gate locks.

Marking the hole position for a Gatemate long throw lock


Unlike the Perrys version of the long throw gate locks, the position of the barrel does vary on the Gatemate versions and does depend on whether you are using a double locking or single locking lock.

To start with, as for the Perrys lock we mark a horizontal centre line where you want the lock to sit, this is the same for the double locking and single locking versions but after this it varies between the two locks –

Double locking versions

To mark the position of the hole for a Gatemate double locking long throw gate lock we now need to mark a second line underneath the centre line (we’ve just marked) 15mm below the first line – once you’ve done this square the line across.

Next, on this second line we now mark a line 58mm in from the edge of the gate. Where these two lines intersect is the centre line of the lock barrel and where you need to drill.

Single locking/spring latch version

To mark the position of the hole for a single locking Gatemate lock/latch long throw gate lock (key locking from the rear only) we now need to mark a second line underneath the centre line (we’ve just marked) 15mm below the first line – once you’ve done this square the line across.

Next, on this second line we now mark a line 50mm in from the edge of the gate. Where these two lines intersect is the centre line of the lock barrel.

For all versions of the long throw gate locks

This applies to all versions of the long throw gate locks –

Once you’ve marked the position of the centre line of the lock barrel, using your 26mm or 28mm spade bit/flat bit drill through the gate until the spur (point) of the drill bit just starts to protrude through the front of the gate.
Drilling for a long throw gate lock
Once the spur appears, go to the front of the gate, line your drill bit up with the small hole the spur has created and complete the hole (don’t drill right the way through the gate, from one side only – you’ll split timber as the drill bit bursts out).
Long throw gate lock postioned on gate

* It’s always worth getting at least one coat of your chosen paint or stain in this cylinder hole prior to securing the lock as if water does gain access between the lock and timber you’ve no protection otherwise!

With the hole drilled out for the barrel of the lock, from the rear of the gate place the lock into position. When it’s sitting on the gate (with the barrel through the hole), line the lock up parallel with the rail of the gate (use a square if you like to do this).

Grab your cordless drill with a 3mm drill bit and pre-drill the four holes on the rear of the lock into the gate. You can either mark the holes with a pencil (then remove the lock) or drill the holes with the lock present if you’re careful. Once you’ve drilled the holes insert the screws to secure the lock to the rear of the gate.

Ted Westie with paint and paint brush

Fitting the long throw lock receiver

We next have to attach the receiver for the lock –
If fitting the lock to a single pedestrian gate, then the receiver fits to the gate post.

If fitting the lock onto a pair of gates, then the receiver fits onto the secondary gate (i.e. gate that opens second in the pair).

To fit the receiver, make sure the lock is in the closed/locked position and sit the receiver over the locking bar and centre it (there is a fair bit of extra room in the receiver) and also parallel it with the gate or post.

Fitting a receiver for a long throw gate lock

Pre-drill with a 3mm drill bit for each of the four holes and then secure the receiver to the gate or post using the screws supplied.

Fitting the long throw lock escutcheon

Front view of a long throw gate lock
Fitting an escutcheon to a long throw gate lock

From the front of the gate you’ve an escutcheon to fit. This sits over the lock barrel and attaches with three brass screws – pre-drill for these using a 2mm drill bit. again either mark out the holes and remove the escutcheon to pre-drill or keep the escutcheon in place and carefully drill through the holes. Once you’ve done this insert the screws and using a slotted screwdriver secure the escutcheon.

Long throw lock handles – optional extras

As an optional extra you’ve a choice of adding a handle in place of an escutcheon (these do not come with the locks as standard but are available as an optional extra). These fit to the front of the gate, over the lock barrel and once the lock has been fitted the handle is fitted (the escutcheon is not needed) by way of three screws.

To fit the handle, simply place the handle over the lock barrel and align so it is sitting parallel to the stile of the gate and pre-drill all holes using a 3mm drill bit. Then secure to the gate using the screws.

Fitting a handle to a long throw gate lock

More tips:
> Wooden gate fitting guide
> Locks for gates and garage doors: a guide