Gate Locks for Wooden Gates & Garage Doors: A Guide

There’s quite a choice of locks for wooden gates and side hinged wooden garage doors, ranging from the simple-to-fit to locks that are harder to fit (but more secure).

In this guide, we round up the best of those available and give you the pros and cons of each!

Use the table of contents below to skip to the information you need:

Locks for Wooden Gates

Auto Gate Catches

You’ve probably seen these around and didn’t know what they were called as they are very common on short front pedestrian access gates. The lockable part is more of an afterthought as the little receiver that automatically drops down when the gate is closed (hence the name!), has a hole through it that allows a padlock to be put through it to prevent opening. Not all auto gate catches lock though, so double check what you are buying – usually those described as ‘light duty’ will not allow the use of a padlock!

pros:

  • Very inexpensive
  • Very easy to fit, usually 6 or so screws and you’re done!
Auto gate catches

A very inexpensive method of locking a gate

Auto gate catches can be found Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Not the greatest looking option but functional
    • Requires a padlock in order to become lockable
    • Not a very secure method of locking

Brenton Padbolt

The Brenton Padbolt, more commonly known as simply a padbolt, is probably the simplest lock to fit to a gate. No real challenges should present themselves as it simply fits to the front or rear face of the gate and attaches using a combination of screws and bolts

The padbolt locks using a padlock, which you’ll have to buy separately, and the main downside is you can only lock or unlock it from the side of the gate to which it is fitted, unless you fit it very near the top of a gate and can reach over to use the thing!

Brenton Padbolt, the simplest lock for a timber gate

A Padbolt or Brenton Padbolt is the easiest gate or door lock to fit

Brenton Padbolts can be found under Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

Padbolt pros:

  • Simple to fit
  • Inexpensive compared to other locks
  • As secure, if not more secure, than a long throw gate lock
  • Can be fitted to all types of gates (i.e. ledged and braced gates, framed ledged and braced gates). See our guide on How to fit a padbolt to a wooden gate.

Padbolt cons:

  • Can only really be used from the side of the gate it is fitted to
  • Not the most secure

Rim Locks

A rimlock is really a very simple lock for a gate or door, so called because it sits on the rim (edge) of a gate or door. Commonly, it is found on the inside of shed doors and on ledged and braced gates; these are not really the most secure as they are really a bit flimsy, weak and not all that secure, as in most cases, if you could get enough leverage to pull the gate open, then the lock bolt can actually snap.

Rimlocks come in two varieties: you’ve the simple lock (pictured right) on its own (opened from either side of the gate with a key) or a lock and latch version, which once unlocked, you have to twist the handles to open – imagine a poorer version of a sashlock and you get the picture!

Basic version of a rimlock fixed to a gate

A simple version of a Rimlock, without a latch

Rimlock pros:

    • Simple to fit
    • Inexpensive compared to other locks
    • Can be operated from either side of the gates
    • Can be fitted on a ledged and braced gate or as a lock for a fence type gate

Rimlock cons:

  • Not the most secure
  • Can be cheap and nasty!
  • Not really suitable for a framed, ledged and braced gate

Nightlatches

Traditionally, these were known as rim locks, though they shouldn’t be confused with the modern day rimlock mentioned above as a Nightlatch lock (more commonly referred to as a ‘Yale lock’, though other brands are available!) is a lot more secure.

I, personally, wouldn’t refer to a Nightlatch as a gate lock but I’ve mentioned it here as we get lots of requests for ‘Yale type locks for gates’. A Nightlatch is fitted to an external door, on the inside face. On the inside face of the lock, you have a little lever handle and usually a snib (this is used to either keep the lock from engaging or to prevent anyone with a key opening the door) now this side is the internal side of the lock and not suitable for being exposed to whatever this great British climate of ours can throw at it and the lock won’t weather at all well.

A Nightlatch commonly referred to as a Yale type lock

A Nightlatch, more commonly referred to
as a Yale lock (other makes are available!)

Nightlatch pros (as a gate lock):

  • Erm, nothing really as it’s not a gate lock!

Nightlatch cons (as a gate lock):

  • Not a gate lock!
  • Not the most secure lock, for example, on a front or back door of your home for insurance purposes, even if you’ve got a Nightlatch fitted, then most insurance companies insist on a 5 Lever Insurance Deadlock being fitted as well.

Long Throw Gate Locks

Perrys, Cays and Gatemate produce two versions (well, four if you include the different sizing options of 50mm and 70mm versions of the locks!) of a long throw gate lock; the ‘throw’ is by how much the locking bar protrudes from the body of the lock; a double-locking option (key lockable from both sides) and a single-locking option (with a simple spring latch on the rear of the lock and a keyhole on the front).

From the front of the gates or doors, all that you’ll see of the long throw lock is the cylinder of the lock protruding through the face of the gates/doors

Long throw gate lock front view

Long throw gate lock front view

Looking for a single locking Perrys gate or door lock? Look no further as you can find them within our shop here!
Despite its name, the long throw gate lock can also be fitted to a garage door; simply select the correct size option; for doors or gates up to 50mm, then select the 50mm lock option and for doors or gates up to 70mm thick, then select the 70mm lock option (the size options refer to the length of the cylinder that fits through the doors or gates).

The double-locking long throw gate lock has the advantage over the padbolt as it can be locked and unlocked from either side of the gate, so no more trying to reach over the gate to unlock the thing; however, in our opinion, assuming somebody has access to the rear of the gate or door then it is not quite as secure as a correctly fitted padbolt (with padlock added)- and at least a padbolt is supplied with bolts to secure it through the gate rather than just screws that the long throw gate locks come with, though there is nothing stopping you from adding some of your own bolts, however.
You can get your Perrys double locking long throw gate locks in our shop here!

A double locking long throw gate lock

Rear view of the double locking long throw
gate lock (key operated each side)

Long throw gate lock with spring latch

Rear of the long throw gate lock with spring latch.
Key operation from the front only

Long throw gate locks can be found under Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

Fitting is simple enough as there is a handy guide supplied with all the locks; the main part of fitting involves drilling a 28mm hole (instructions that are supplied with the long throw locks mention a 26mm hole, however both Perrys and Gatemate supply 28mm spade bits specifically for these locks as a 26mm hole is quite tight to get the barrel of the lock into) through the gate or door to take the actual cylinder of the lock. Once this is done, the lock just actually screws onto the rear of the gate and here, in our opinion, is what lets this lock down, as anybody who wants to overcome the lock can simply screw it off; a correctly fitted padbolt has two bolts that must be removed; again, these bolts are simple enough to undo, however, it takes a bit more time to do this.

Longthrow gate lock pros:

  • Better looking than a padbolt (wolf whistle!)
  • Double-locking option gives the ability to unlock from either side of the gate
  • Single locking option is handy if you don’t want the hassle of unlocking (from the rear only) with a key
  • Cheaper than a mortice lock
  • Can be fitted to a gate or door

Longthrow gate lock cons:

  • Not really any more secure than a Brenton Padbolt
  • Far less secure than a mortice deadlock
  • More expensive than a Brenton Padbolt
  • Cannot be fitted anywhere on the gate or door (See below)

Mortice Deadlocks

If security is your thing, then a mortice deadlock is the way to go. You’ll see these as being commonly 3 or 5 levers (the levers being part of the mechanism within the lock, the more levers it has, the more secure it is). For insurance purposes, at least a 5 lever lock is a must (hence the name 5 lever insurance lock!). This doesn’t fit to the gate or door, it fits inside it, meaning it cannot simply be unscrewed and removed; to get it out you’ve got to get the doors open!

A mortice deadlock gives you the ability to unlock or lock the gates/doors from either side, as once fitted you’ve a keyhole on either side.

Also be aware, that as these sit within the door or gate, then there is a minimum thickness of door which it can be securely fitted into, usually this is 44mm but does vary from lock to lock.

A good mortice deadlock will also meet certain British Standards (look out for the Kitemark) as well as being CE marked and, in some cases, will also be ‘Police Preferred, secured by design’. The deadlocks we supply meet all three criteria.

Mortice deadlock fitted to a gate

A mortice deadlock fits within the gate or door

Mortice deadlocks can be found under Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

Mortice deadlock pros:

  • More secure than any other gate lock on the market
  • Key lockable from both sides
  • Usually guaranteed
  • Available as a 5 lever insurance deadlock
  • Can be fitted to both gates and doors

Mortice deadlock cons:

  • Slightly more difficult to fit as you need to cut into the edge of the gate
  • Cannot be fitted to ledged and braced gates/doors
  • More expensive than a Brenton Padbolt and long throw gate lock
  • Cannot be fitted anywhere on the gate (see below)

Mortice Sashlocks

These are like a mortice deadlock in almost every way but with one exception; a sashlock needs a pair of handles fitted to it. The sashlock gives you the option of leaving the doors unlocked but still held closed by way of the latch within the lock; you need to physically pull the handle down to release the latch and open the door.

Again, mortice sashlocks are usually 3 or 5 lever and the more levers the lock has, the more secure it is; again, look for a lock that is ‘Police Preferred, secured by design’, that has a British standard kitemark and also CE markings.

A mortice sashlock fitted to a garage door

A mortice sashlock requires a pair of handles

Mortice sashlocks can be found under Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

Mortice sashlock pros:

  • More secure than any other gate/door lock on the market
  • Key-lockable from both sides
  • Has a latch as well as a lock
  • Usually guaranteed
  • Available as a 5 lever insurance deadlock
  • Can be fitted to doors

Mortice sashlock cons:

    • Won’t work on any gate where you have clearances (either between the two gates or gate and post) of 10mm or over as usually the latch bolt only has a 10mm throw (throw being how far the latch bolt protrudes).

Slightly more difficult to fit as you need to cut into the edge of the gate

  • Cannot be fitted to ledged and braced gates/doors
  • More expensive than a Brenton Padbolt and long throw gate lock
  • Cannot be fitted anywhere on the door (see below)
  • A pair of lever latch handles are required
  • Not really a gate lock

D&D Lokklatch Deluxe

The Lokklatch deluxe is a modern twist on the traditional auto gate catches. Unlike the auto gate catches however this is key lockable and is available in a hybrid of stainless steel and black polymer which gives a long lasting, corrosion resistant latch.

pros:

  • Fairly easy to fit
  • Hidden fixings
  • Key lockable from either side
  • Corrosion resistant stainless steel & moulded polymer finish
Lokklatch deluxe

D&D Lokklatch Deluxe

D&D Lokklatch deluxe can be found under Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Not the cheapest option on the market

D&D Magnalatch

Like the D&D Lokklatch deluxe, the Magnalatch is similar to the auto gate catch in that as you gate is closed the latch pops out and engages.

You can then lock by way of a key hole in the side of the latch bar. There are two versions of this, one is lockable and one isn’t so make sure you pick the correct version!

pros:

  • Quick and easy to install
  • No unsightly fixings
  • No padlock required
  • Able to adjust position of lock both horizontally and vertically after installation
  • Made from weather resistant stainless steel and moulded polymer
  • Manufacturers Lifetime Warranty

D&D Magnalatches can be found under Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • There are most cost effective solutions on the market

D&D Lokklatch Magnetic

The D&D Lokklatch magnetic appearance always reminds me of a caravan door lock, as the name implies it is a lock and a latch with both being able to operate from either side of the gates.

It’s fairly easy to fit for anybody with a basic grasp of DIY and once fitted it can be adjusted at a later date if needed. You’ve also got a choice of different coloured trims allowing you to ‘pimp up’ your lock, should you wish to!

pros:

  • It’s a latch as well as a lock
  • Nicer looking (if that’s your thing!) than most gate locks
  • Can be locked / unlocked from either side of the gate
  • Manufactured from corrosion resistant stainless steel and black polymer
  • Manufacturers lifetime warranty

D&D Lokkbolt Dropbolts can be found under Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Again not the most economical option out there

Lockable Dropbolts

Not technically a lock in itself but still lockable as the name implies is the lockable dropbolt. This is ideal as a lock for driveway gates. Used in place of a standard non-locking dropbolt, the lockable version is fitted on a pair of gates and locks one of the gates to the ground using a padlock.

Lockable dropbolt pros:

  • Can be used alone, giving pedestrian access through a pair of gates (one gate can still be opened),
  • Can be combined with another lock such as a padbolt, long throw lock or deadlock for more security
  • Simple to fit, though a lock block may have to be added to your gates
  • Fairly inexpensive to purchase
  • Available in a marine grade stainless steel and galvanised finishes
Lockable dropbolt fitted to a pair of gates

A lockable dropbolt can add extra security

Lockable dropbolts can be found under Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

Lockable dropbolt cons:

    • Can only be unlocked from the side of the gate it is fitted to
    • For more security, it needs combining with either a padbolt, long throw gate lock or deadlock
    • Not available in a black or black on galv finish

D&D Lokkbolt Dropbolts

In essence a Lokkbolt dropbolt does the same job as a lockable dropbolt, however they do differ slightly as you don’t need to add a padlock to them – there is already a key lock built in. Available in both 18″ and 24″ lengths and supplied keyed alike – one key can open multiple Lokkbolts. Being a hybrid of stainless steel and moulded polymer, you will have no problems with corrosion and it can be fitted to typically acidic timbers like Oak or Accoya with no problems.

Lokkbolt dropbolt pros:

  • Like the lockable dropbolt, the D&D Lokkbolt can be used alone, giving pedestrian access through a pair of gates (one gate can still be opened),
  • Can be combined with another lock such as a padbolt, long throw lock or deadlock for more security
  • Simple to fit, though a lock block may have to be added to your gates
  • No need for a padlock as the lock is built into the Lokkbolt
  • Can be keyed alike, this gives you the one key to open multiple Lokkbolts
  • Better looking than a standard lockable dropbolt
  • Manufacturers lifetime warranty

D&D Lokkbolt dropbolts can be found under Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

Lokkbolt dropbolt cons:

    • Can only be unlocked from the side of the gate it is fitted to
    • For more security, it needs combining with either a padbolt, long throw gate lock or deadlock
    • As the lock is built into the lokkbolt, if you lose the keys then it could be a nightmare from a security perspective
    • Not the cheapest option and a standard lockable dropbolt is far more inexpensive.

Where can I fit a mortice sashlock/deadlock or long throw gate lock?

The longthrow locks (both versions) and deadlocks cannot be fitted anywhere on the gates; on a framed ledged and braced gate, if you fit on a horizontal rail (or near the horizontal rail for a deadlock), then you will undermine the joint between the stile (vertical upright, main frame of gate) and horizontal rail, as the majority of the joint is cut away to take the locks. To maintain the integrity of the joint, it is always recommended that a lock block or dummy rail is fitted to take the gate lock.

Further reading – Secured by Design
Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop

Locks for Wooden Garage Doors

Locks for wooden garage doors

In the main the locks mentioned are all suitable for side hinged wooden garage doors, however as we are also asked about locking methods for other types of doors, we have also briefly covered this at the very end of the post.

Hasp & staple

This is probably the cheapest method of locking your garage doors. Easy to fit and either screws of better still bolts to the doors. You will need to add a padlock and once unlocked and the lock removed there is nothing to stop the door swinging open. If you do go down this route then don’t go for the wire version of the hasp and staple as these are quite poorly made and not very strong, instead go for the heavy pattern (heavy duty).

pros:

  • Very economical
  • Easy to fit
Hasp and staple

Hasp and staple, a very basic method of locking

cons:

  • Not the most secure garage door lock
  • Needs a padlock
  • Can only be operated from the side of the doors it is fitted to
  • Once unlocked and the padlock removed, no way of stopping your door swinging open

Brenton Padbolt

We covered this in our gate locks section
as it can be used on both. An economical, if unsightly option and better than a hasp and staple as you can stop the doors swinging open when no lock is present as it features a shoot bolt. You will need to add a padlock to secure the padbolt and it can only be operated from the side of the doors it is fitted to.

pros:

  • Very economical
  • Easy to fit
Padbolt on a gate

Brenton Padbolt (shown on a gate)

The Brenton Padbolt can be found at Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

  • Not the most secure garage door lock
  • Needs a padlock
  • Can only be operated from the side of the doors it is fitted to

Swivelling locking bar

Swivelling locking bars come in various lengths and are primarily used for securing double doors. It’s similar to a hasp and staple but more heavy duty and the hasp once hinged away from the staple swivels down. Once fitted and in the locked position all fixings are hidden giving a bit more security than a padbolt. Like a hasp and staple it does need a padlock and once this lock is removed the doors can swing open.

pros:

  • Heavy duty
  • Once the locking bar is locked up all fixings are hidden
Swivel locking bar

A swivelling locking bar

Swivelling locking bars can be seen at Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Needs a padlock
    • Quite industrial looking, so ok for workshop doors but not new shiny garage doors

Shed locking bar

Can be used on any outward opening door, so long as it is long enough to fit to the door frame on either side. A bracket is fitted to the door frame on either side of the door, this then lets you fit a padlock-able bar through the brackets and lock it in place.

pros:

  • Quite easy to fit
Shed locking bar

A shed locking bar can be used on most outward opening doors – not just sheds

Swivelling locking bars can be seen at Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Not the quickest method to use each time you want to lock the doors
    • Awkward and sometimes impossible to use on door frames that are set back from the face of the brickwork.
    • Requires a padlock

Nightlatches

Quite commonly known as ‘Yale locks’ (though other brands are available or cylinder locks, these can be used on some garage doors. However if you’ve double doors that have rebated meeting stiles and open out then you will not get it to work without a bit of bodging about as it’s not made for these doors!

pros:

  • Easy to fit
Nightlatch lock

A Nightlatch otherwise known as a Yale or cylinder lock

The Brenton Padbolt can be found at Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

  • Cannot adequately be fitted to outward opening doors with rebated meeting stiles
  • Should be combined with a more secure lock such as a mortice lock for improved security

Long throw gate locks

Despite it’s name it can be used on garage doors, you’ve a choice of 50mm or 70mm versions which relate to how thick the doors are – for example on doors up to 50mm thick you would use the 50mm versions and then a further choice of double locking (key lockable/un-lockable from either side) or single locking (key locking/unlocking from the front with a thumb latch to unlock on the rear).

pros:

  • More economical than a mortice lock and easier to fit
  • More secure than a padbolt and no padlock to lose
Rear view of a double locking long throw gate lock

Rear view of the double locking long throw lock, on the single locking version you’ll see a thumb latch instead of a keyhole! Both versions are lockable/unlockable from the front with a key

Long throw gate locks Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Not as secure as a mortice lock as fits to the door rather than inside it

Mortice Deadlocks

Again these were mentioned on the gate locks section. If looking for a mortice lock then go for a 5 Lever insurance lock, this is usually stipulated by your insurance policy for any external doors, hence the name ‘insurance lock’. Anything less than the 5 lever option is less secure.

A mortice deadlock allows for the lock to be opened from either side of the doors, being a deadlock however once the lock is unlocked there is nothing to stop the doors from being pushed or blown open as it doesn’t have a latch – just a lock

If buying a deadlock then it’s worth checking whether your doors have rebated meeting stiles or not (doors overlap when closed), if so then you will need to also purchase a matching rebate kit as otherwise you will not be able to fit the lock.

If buying a deadlock then look for one that meets British Standards and is also CE Marked.

pros:

  • A very secure garage door lock
  • Key lockable from either side
  • Available as a 5 lever insurance lock to keep your insurance company happy!
  • Apart from an escutcheon (keyhole surround), not much visible on the doors as the locks fits within the door
Mortice deadlock

If opting for a deadlock then get the 5 Lever version as more secure

5 Lever insurance deadlocks seen in Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Cannot be fitted to ledged and braced doors, doors must be based on a framed, ledged and braced construction
    • A rebate kit must be used on doors with rebated meeting stiles
    • As you will need to cut out the door to take the lock it may be a job for a pro!

Mortice Sashlocks

Sashlocks are similar to deadlocks in that they fit within the door and are available in 3 or 5 lever versions (again 5 lever being an insurance lock). Where they differ to deadlocks is as well as the deadlock bolt they also feature a latch (and will require a pair of handles to work).

The doors can be left unlocked and the door won’t swing open in a breeze etc, as to open the door you will have to physically pull the handle down to open the door. If you’ve a wooden front door then in all likelihood you have a mortice sashlock fitted.

As with a deadlock they can be fitted to doors with rebated meeting stiles, you’ll just need a matching rebate kit to be able to fit the lock.

pros:

  • A 5 lever insurance sashlock will more than likely satisfy your insurance company (hence the name!)
  • Comprise a latch as well as a lock
  • Key lockable and openable from either side
  • Useful if you use your garage as a workshop or similar and are constantly come and go out of the garage as you can leave the doors securely shut without having to lock them
5 Lever mortice sashlock

A mortice sashlock, requires a pair of lever lock handles to operate

Mortice sashlocks can be found Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Can be awkward to fit if you’ve never fitted one before
    • Unsuitable for ledged and braced doors, for best results needs fitting to frame ledged and braced doors
    • Requires a pair of lever lock handles to operate
    • For use on pairs of doors with rebated meeting stiles then a rebate kit must also be purchased

Hinge Bolts

Not technically a lock (but it’s my blog and I’ll write what I want!!) but does add a bit more security to your doors. These sit within the doors on the hinge side and the domed head protrudes out, as the doors are closed they locate into a receiver in the door frame. Fitted in pairs, usually top and bottom on each door they can be fitted on both inward and outward opening doors.

pros:

  • Relatively inexpensive
  • Adds an extra layer of security to your doors
  • Resists hacksawing and attempts to remove the door from its frame
Hinge bolts

Hinge bolts, also known as dog bolts

Hinge bolts can be found atLocks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Not an lock and is used in conjunction with a decent lock

Lockable dropbolt

Again this was covered in our gate locks section but is worth a mention here. Not really to be relied upon as the sole lock on your garage doors and should be used in conjunction with some other form of lock. The Lockable dropbolt is used in place of the standard dropbolt (on the bottom of the secondary door that opens) and allows you to lock (with a padlock) the door to the floor.

pros:

  • Adds a bit more security to your doors
  • A good option if you want to securely lock one door shut whilst allowing the master door to be unlocked for pedestrian access
Lockable dropbolt

A lockable dropbolt, should be used as added security and not the sole locking method

Lockable dropbolts can be seen at Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Needs combining with another method of locking
    • Requires a padlock
    • Can only be opened from the side of the door it is fitted to

Van locks

Van locks, what the….?! Yes you’ve read it correctly, some makes of van locks can be used on double doors. Personally I wouldn’t choose them myself for a pair of garage doors on my house, but if you are using the doors as workshop doors then it is an option for you just so long as the doors don’t have rebated meeting stiles.

Sort of a hasp and staple that is combined (and usually supplied) with a heavy duty padlock. Bolts to the doors so fairly easy to fit, personally I’d stick to a 5 lever insurance mortice lock.

pros:

  • Heavy duty lock usually supplied with a heavy duty padlock
Van lock

Some van locks can be used on double doors, however not double doors with rebated meeting stiles

Van locks can be seen in Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop.

cons:

    • Again rather industrial looking
    • Not suitable for doors with rebated meeting stiles
    • A bit expensive for what is in effect a heavy duty hasp and staple!

Not really a suitable locking method for side hinged garage doors (or double doors)

We are asked a lot about the following locks, so although they are unsuitable for double doors we thought we would add them here and talk a bit about them.

Garage door defender / Garage door protector kit

There is no doubt that this is a good lock for up and over doors, however it will not work on side hinged/side opening doors. The way the garage door defender / protector works is, you fit a plate (with a staple that takes a lock built in) to the floor under the up and over door where the door would be in the closed position, once fitted you close the door and attach the top piece over this (which comprises a hasp) which also sits upon the bottom edge of the closed door and attach a padlock.

pros:

  • None for side hinged doors!
  • Great for up and over doors!
Garage door defender

Garage door defenders (or garage door protectors), cannot be used on side hung garage doors

cons:

  • Not suitable for side hinged doors

T Handle garage door lock

These are another that we are asked about from time to time, if you’ve an up and over door then they are probably familiar as they are used only on up and over garage doors and not suitable for use on side hinged doors.

pros:

  • None for side hung doors
  • Great on up and over doors!
T handle garage door lock

T handle garage door locks cannot be used on side hung garage doors!

cons:

    • Not suitable for side hinged garage doors

Further reading – Secured by Design
Locks, Bolts & Latches in our Ironmongery Shop

2 thoughts on “Gate Locks for Wooden Gates & Garage Doors: a guide.

  1. The number oif different locks is bewildering Can you advise,?
    My ledged and braced garden gate is very good quality and i am looking for a lock that be surface fitted and opened from the inside only. What do you suggest It is 2 3/4 inches thick

    1. Jon C says:

      Probably something like a padbolt bolt with a padlock attached will do the job, economical and simple! There is not really a great deal on the market for being able to lock from just one side, everything is more tailored to being able to lock/unlock froom both sides.

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